Current Adult Smokers

Current Smoking Among Adults Nationally

Cigarette smoking disproportionately affects the health of people with low socioeconomic status.

Lower-income cigarette smokers suffer more from diseases caused by smoking than do smokers with higher incomes Health [1]The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress: A Report of the Surgeon General. Figure 2.1, Adult per capita cigarette consumption and major smoking and health events, United States, … Continue reading.

Populations in the most socioeconomically deprived groups have higher lung cancer risk than those in the most affluent groups. People with less than a high school education have higher lung cancer incidence than those with a college education [2]Creamer MR WT, Babb S, et al. Tobacco Product Use and Cessation Indicators Among Adults – United States, 2018. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 2019. 2018;68(45):1013-9, [3]Teresa W. Wang PKA, MSPH1; Andrea S. Gentzke, PhD1; Karen A. Cullen, PhD2; Enver Holder-Hayes, MPH2; Carolyn Reyes-Guzman, PhD3; Ahmed Jamal, MBBS1; Linda Neff, PhD1; Brian A. King, PhD. Tobacco … Continue reading.

People with family incomes of less than $12,500 have higher lung cancer incidence than those with family incomes of $50,000 or more.

People living in rural, deprived areas have 18–20% higher rates of lung cancer than people living in urban areas [4]Op. cit. Creamer MR WT, Babb S, et al. Tobacco Product Use and Cessation Indicators Among Adults – United States, 2018. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 2019. 2018;68(45):1013-9.

Lower-income populations have less access to health care, making it more likely that they are diagnosed at later stages of disease or condition [5]Op. cit. The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress: A Report of the Surgeon General. Figure 2.1, Adult per capita cigarette consumption and major smoking and health events, United … Continue reading

Current Smoking Among Adults Nationally

Cigarette smoking disproportionately affects the health of people with low socioeconomic status.

Lower-income cigarette smokers suffer more from diseases caused by smoking than do smokers with higher incomes Health [6]Op. cit. The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress: A Report of the Surgeon General. Figure 2.1, Adult per capita cigarette consumption and major smoking and health events, United … Continue reading.

Populations in the most socioeconomically deprived groups have higher lung cancer risk than those in the most affluent groups[7]Op. cit. Creamer MR WT, Babb S, et al. Tobacco Product Use and Cessation Indicators Among Adults – United States, 2018. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 2019. 2018;68(45):1013-9. People with less than a high school education have higher lung cancer incidence than those with a college education[8]Op. cit. Teresa W. Wang PKA, MSPH1; Andrea S. Gentzke, PhD1; Karen A. Cullen, PhD2; Enver Holder-Hayes, MPH2; Carolyn Reyes-Guzman, PhD3; Ahmed Jamal, MBBS1; Linda Neff, PhD1; Brian A. King, PhD. … Continue reading.

People with family incomes of less than $12,500 have higher lung cancer incidence than those with family incomes of $50,000 or more.

People living in rural, deprived areas have 18–20% higher rates of lung cancer than people living in urban areas[9]Op. cit. Creamer MR WT, Babb S, et al. Tobacco Product Use and Cessation Indicators Among Adults – United States, 2018. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 2019. 2018;68(45):1013-9.

Lower-income populations have less access to health care, making it more likely that they are diagnosed at later stages of diseases and conditions[10]Op. cit. The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress: A Report of the Surgeon General. Figure 2.1, Adult* per capita cigarette consumption and major smoking and health events, United … Continue reading.

 By Gender

[11]Op. cit. Cornelius ME, Wang TW, Jamal A, Loretan C, Neff L. Tobacco Product Use Among Adults – United States, 2019. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, 2020. Volume 69(issue 46); pages … Continue reading.

Men were more likely to be current cigarette smokers than women.

  • Nearly 16 of every 100 adult men (15.3%)
  • About 12 of every 100 adult women (12.7%)

By age

Current cigarette smoking was highest among people aged 25–44 years and 45–64 years. Current cigarette smoking was lowest among people aged 18-24 years. [12]Op. cit. Cornelius ME, Wang TW, Jamal A, Loretan C, Neff L. Tobacco Product Use Among Adults – United States, 2019. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, 2020. Volume 69(issue 46); pages … Continue reading.

  • Nearly 8 of every 100 adults aged 18–24 years (8%)
  • Nearly 17 of every 100 adults aged 25–44 years (16.7%)
  • About 16 of every 100 adults aged 45–64 years (17%)
  • About 8 of every 100 adults aged 65 years and older (8.2%)

Smoking prevalence by race, ethnicity

E-cigarette/vaporizer use by race and ethnicity

US E-Cig use by race
[13]Villarroel MA, Cha AE, Vahratian A. Electronic cigarette use among U.S. adults, 2018. NCHS Data Brief, no 365. Hyattsville, MD: National Center for Health Statistics. 2020.

By Education

[14]Op. cit. Cornelius ME, Wang TW, Jamal A, Loretan C, Neff L. Tobacco Product Use Among Adults – United States, 2019. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, 2020. Volume 69(issue 46); pages … Continue reading.

smoking by education level

By sexual orientation

[15]Op. Cit. Cornelius ME, Wang TW, Jamal A, Loretan C, Neff L. Tobacco Product Use Among Adults – United States, 2019. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, 2020. Volume 69(issue 46); pages … Continue reading.

Smoking in the LGBT community

According to a National Health Information Survey, nearly 20.5% of lesbian, gay, or bisexual adults report being current cigarette smokers compared with 15.3% of adults who identify as straight.  Among young adults — ages 18-24 — the rates are even higher. LGBT young adults are nearly twice as likely to use tobacco as non-LGBT counterparts, and over 40 percent of LGBT young adults are occasional cigarette smokers. [16]American Lung Association. The LGBT Community: A Priority Population for Tobacco Control pdf icon[PDF–367 KB]external icon. Greenwood Village (CO): American Lung Association, Smokefree … Continue reading.

By those with disabilities

Current cigarette smoking is significantly higher among adults with a disability (27.8%) compared to adults without a disability (13.4%). The percentage of adults with disabilities using E-cigarettes is also higher (8%) compared to adults without disabilities (3.9%) [17]National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities. Cigarette Smoking Among Adults with Disabilities. 2019.

By substance use disorders

Tobacco use among adults in the US reporting substance use disorders, report 18.2% higher illicit drug use rate and 10.7% higher alcohol use rate.

By locality:  

Adults that live in rural areas smoke at a rate of 17.3 percent compared to 12.4 percent among adults that live in urban areas. They are also more likely to be heavier smokers, smoking 15 or more cigarettes per day, compared to smokers in urban areas [18]Prevention CDC. Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance Survey – Analysis by the American Lung Association Epidemiology and Statistics Unit using SPSS software. 2018. Children in rural areas are also more likely to start smoking at a younger age and smoke daily, making addiction more severe and smoking harder to quit [19]Association AL. Cutting Tobacco’s Rural Roots: Tobacco Use in Rural Communities. 2015.

By use of tobacco product:

Percentage of adults aged 18 years or older who reported tobacco product use “every day” or “some days,” by tobacco product type, 2018 [20]Op. cit. Prevention CfDCa. Tobacco Product Use and Cessation Indicators Among Adults — United States, 2018. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Reports (MMWR). 2019;68 45:

  • Cigarettes: 13.7%.
  • Cigars, cigarillos, or filtered little cigars: 3.9%.
  • Electronic cigarettes (E-cigarettes): 3.2%
  • Smokeless tobacco (chewing tobacco, snuff, dip, snus, or dissolvable tobacco): 2.4%.
  • Pipes, water pipes, or hookahs: 1.0%.
  • Any combustible tobacco product: 16.5%.
  • Used 2 or more tobacco products: 3.7%.

References

References
1 The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress: A Report of the Surgeon General. Figure 2.1, Adult per capita cigarette consumption and major smoking and health events, United States, 1900–2012. 2014
2 Creamer MR WT, Babb S, et al. Tobacco Product Use and Cessation Indicators Among Adults – United States, 2018. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 2019. 2018;68(45):1013-9
3 Teresa W. Wang PKA, MSPH1; Andrea S. Gentzke, PhD1; Karen A. Cullen, PhD2; Enver Holder-Hayes, MPH2; Carolyn Reyes-Guzman, PhD3; Ahmed Jamal, MBBS1; Linda Neff, PhD1; Brian A. King, PhD. Tobacco Product Use Among Adults — United States, 2017. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report -MMWR. 2018;67(44):1225–32
4, 7, 9 Op. cit. Creamer MR WT, Babb S, et al. Tobacco Product Use and Cessation Indicators Among Adults – United States, 2018. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 2019. 2018;68(45):1013-9
5, 6 Op. cit. The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress: A Report of the Surgeon General. Figure 2.1, Adult per capita cigarette consumption and major smoking and health events, United States, 1900–2012. 2014
8 Op. cit. Teresa W. Wang PKA, MSPH1; Andrea S. Gentzke, PhD1; Karen A. Cullen, PhD2; Enver Holder-Hayes, MPH2; Carolyn Reyes-Guzman, PhD3; Ahmed Jamal, MBBS1; Linda Neff, PhD1; Brian A. King, PhD. Tobacco Product Use Among Adults — United States, 2017. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR). 2018;67(44):1225–32
10 Op. cit. The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress: A Report of the Surgeon General. Figure 2.1, Adult* per capita cigarette consumption and major smoking and health events, United States, 1900–2012. 2014
11 Op. cit. Cornelius ME, Wang TW, Jamal A, Loretan C, Neff L. Tobacco Product Use Among Adults – United States, 2019. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, 2020. Volume 69(issue 46); pages 1736–1742
12 Op. cit. Cornelius ME, Wang TW, Jamal A, Loretan C, Neff L. Tobacco Product Use Among Adults – United States, 2019. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, 2020. Volume 69(issue 46); pages 1736–1742
13 Villarroel MA, Cha AE, Vahratian A. Electronic cigarette use among U.S. adults, 2018. NCHS Data Brief, no 365. Hyattsville, MD: National Center for Health Statistics. 2020
14 Op. cit. Cornelius ME, Wang TW, Jamal A, Loretan C, Neff L. Tobacco Product Use Among Adults – United States, 2019. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, 2020. Volume 69(issue 46); pages 1736–1742
15 Op. Cit. Cornelius ME, Wang TW, Jamal A, Loretan C, Neff L. Tobacco Product Use Among Adults – United States, 2019. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, 2020. Volume 69(issue 46); pages 1736–1742.
16 American Lung Association. The LGBT Community: A Priority Population for Tobacco Control pdf icon[PDF–367 KB]external icon. Greenwood Village (CO): American Lung Association, Smokefree Communities Project
17 National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities. Cigarette Smoking Among Adults with Disabilities. 2019
18 Prevention CDC. Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance Survey – Analysis by the American Lung Association Epidemiology and Statistics Unit using SPSS software. 2018
19 Association AL. Cutting Tobacco’s Rural Roots: Tobacco Use in Rural Communities. 2015
20 Op. cit. Prevention CfDCa. Tobacco Product Use and Cessation Indicators Among Adults — United States, 2018. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Reports (MMWR). 2019;68 45