Exposure Over Time

Report on smoking trends and tobacco smoke exposure

Secondhand Smoke Exposure Over Time

Exposure to SHS is measured by testing saliva, urine, or blood to see if it contains cotinine.  Cotinine is created when the body breaks down the nicotine found in tobacco smoke [1]Smoking & Tobacco Use. In: (OSH) OoSaH, editor. Atlanta, GA: Center for Disease Control and Prevention; 2017.

  • During 1988–1991, almost 90 of every 100 (87.9%) nonsmokers had measurable levels of cotinine[2]Prevention. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Vital Signs: Nonsmokers’ Exposure to Secondhand Smoke — United States, 1999–2008. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report … Continue reading.
  • During 2007–2008, about 40 of every 100 (40.1%) nonsmokers had measurable levels of cotinine [3]Ibid, Prevention. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Vital Signs: Nonsmokers’ Exposure to Secondhand Smoke — United States, 1999–2008. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report … Continue reading.
  • During 2011–2012, about 25 of every 100 (25.3%) nonsmokers had measurable levels of cotinine[4]Prevention Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Vital Signs: Disparities in Nonsmokers’ Exposure to Secondhand Smoke — United States, 1999–2012. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report … Continue reading.
  • Measurements of cotinine shomfnw that exposure to SHS has decreased in the United States over time[5]Ibid, Prevention Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Vital Signs: Disparities in Nonsmokers’ Exposure to Secondhand Smoke — United States, 1999–2012. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly … Continue reading.

The decrease in exposure to secondhand smoke is likely due to: 

The growing number of states and communities with laws that do not allow smoking in indoor areas of workplaces and public places, including restaurants, bars, and casinos[6]Op. cit. Prevention. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Vital Signs: Nonsmokers’ Exposure to Secondhand Smoke — United States, 1999–2008. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly … Continue reading.

  • The growing number of households with voluntary smokefree home rules that decline significantly in areas with higher cigarette smoking rates,
  • Smoking around nonsmokers has become much less socially acceptable.

 

References

References
1 Smoking & Tobacco Use. In: (OSH) OoSaH, editor. Atlanta, GA: Center for Disease Control and Prevention; 2017
2 Prevention. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Vital Signs: Nonsmokers’ Exposure to Secondhand Smoke — United States, 1999–2008. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR). 2010;59(35):1141-6
3 Ibid, Prevention. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Vital Signs: Nonsmokers’ Exposure to Secondhand Smoke — United States, 1999–2008. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR). 2010;59(35):1141-6
4 Prevention Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Vital Signs: Disparities in Nonsmokers’ Exposure to Secondhand Smoke — United States, 1999–2012. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR). 2015;64(04):103-8
5 Ibid, Prevention Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Vital Signs: Disparities in Nonsmokers’ Exposure to Secondhand Smoke — United States, 1999–2012. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR). 2015;64(04):103-8
6 Op. cit. Prevention. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Vital Signs: Nonsmokers’ Exposure to Secondhand Smoke — United States, 1999–2008. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR). 2010;59(35):1141-6