Where There's Smoke

Report on smoking trends and tobacco smoke exposure

Secondhand Tobacco Smoke – Exposure Report Overview

This report was developed to provide an overview of current smoking rates and trends. It includes the use of vaporizers and a look at who is smoking. This briefing provides information and data on nonsmokers exposed to tobacco smoke, as well as actions and policies that may help lower tobacco smoke exposure.
Current smoking rates in the United States (US) stand at about 16.1% overall but vary based on state, gender, age, education, poverty, state and local regulatory laws, tobacco taxes, among other factors addressed in this report.

Secondhand tobacco smoke (SHS) is a mixture of the smoke from the burning tip of a combusted tobacco product and smoke exhaled by a smoker into the surrounding air. A 2006 Report of the Surgeon General, The Health Consequences of Involuntary Exposure to Tobacco Smoke, concludes that there is no safe level of exposure to SHS, which contains over 7,000 chemicals, including about 70 that can cause cancer. Each year exposure to SHS causes more than 41,000 deaths from lung cancer and heart disease among non-smoking adults and 400 deaths from Sudden Infant Death Syndrome, as well as about $5.6 billion annually in lost productivity [1]U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress: A Report of the Surgeon General. 2014.

Over 58 million people are still exposed

Exposure to SHS has lowered over time with the reduction of smoking rates and with the implementation of pubic and workplace smoking restrictions. Unfortunately, progress has stalled since about 2014, and as of 2018, over 58 million Americans, including more vulnerable populations, are likely still being exposed to SHS.[2]US Department of Health and Human Services. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2018). Decline Stalls: 58 Million Americans Still Exposed to Secondhand Smoke Exposure remains high for … Continue reading.

 

 

References

References
1 U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress: A Report of the Surgeon General. 2014
2 US Department of Health and Human Services. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2018). Decline Stalls: 58 Million Americans Still Exposed to Secondhand Smoke Exposure remains high for certain groups, including kids. https://www.cdc.gov/media/releases/2018/p1206-secondhand-smoke.html [Press Release]. 06 December, 2018